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English definition of “fate”

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fate

noun uk   /feɪt/ us  
B2 [C usually singular] what happens to a particular person or thing, especially something final or negative, such as death or defeat: We want to decide our own fate. His fate is now in the hands of the jury. The disciples were terrified that they would suffer/meet the same fate as Jesus.B2 [U] a power that some people believe causes and controls all events, so that you cannot change or control the way things will happen: When we met again by chance in Cairo, I felt it must be fate. Fate has brought us together.
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Translations of “fate”
in Korean 운명…
in Arabic قَدَر, مَصير…
in French destin, sort…
in Turkish son, akıbet, ölüm…
in Italian destino, sorte…
in Chinese (Traditional) 命中註定的事, 命運, (尤指)厄運…
in Russian участь, судьба…
in Polish los, przeznaczenie…
in Spanish destino, suerte…
in Portuguese destino, sina…
in German das Schicksal…
in Catalan destí, sort…
in Japanese 運命の力, 運命…
in Chinese (Simplified) 命中注定的事, 命运, (尤指)厄运…
(Definition of fate from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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