favour Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "favour" - English Dictionary

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favournoun

UK (US favor) uk   /ˈfeɪ.vər/  us   /-vɚ/

favour noun (SUPPORT)

B2 [U] the support or approval of something or someone: These plans are unlikely to find favour unless the cost is reduced. The Council voted in favour of a £200 million housing development. She is out of favour (= unpopular) with her colleagues. Her economic theories are in favour (= popular) with the current government. He sent her presents in an attempt to win her favour.be in favour of sth/doing sth to support or approve of something: Are you in favour of a ban on smoking? I'm not in favour of hitting children.in your favour C1 When something is in your favour, it gives you an advantage: This candidate has a lot in her favour, especially her experience of teaching.find in sb's favour If a judge finds in someone's favour, he or she says that that person is not guilty.
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favour noun (KIND ACT)

B1 [C] a kind action that you do for someone: She called to ask me a favour. Could you do me a favour - would you feed my cat this weekend? [C usually plural] an advantage that you give to someone, such as money or a good job, especially when this is unfair: Several politicians were accused of dispensing favours to people who voted for them.
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favour noun (PRESENT)

[C usually plural] a small present that you give to every guest at a wedding, party, etc.: wedding favours

favourverb [T]

UK (US favor) uk   /ˈfeɪ.vər/  us   /-vɚ/
to support or prefer one particular possibility: These are the running shoes favoured by marathon runners. In the survey, a majority of people favoured higher taxes and better public services over (= rather than) tax cuts. [+ -ing verb] I generally favour travelling by night, when the roads are quiet. to give an advantage to someone or something, in an unfair way: A strong wind will favour the bigger boats. She always felt that her parents favoured her brother.
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favoured
adjective (US favored) uk   /-vəd/  us   /-vɚd/
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of favour from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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