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English definition of “feature”

feature

noun uk   /ˈfiː.tʃər/ us    /-tʃɚ/

feature noun (QUALITY)

B2 [C] a typical quality or an important part of something: The town's main features are its beautiful mosque and ancient marketplace. Our latest model of phone has several new features. A unique feature of these rock shelters was that they were dry. [C] a part of a building or of an area of land: a geographical feature This tour takes in the area's best-known natural features, including the Gullfoss waterfall. The most striking feature of the house was a huge two-storey room running the entire breadth and height of the building. B2 [C usually plural] one of the parts of someone's face that you notice when you look at them: He has wonderful strong features. regular (= even and attractive) features Her eyes are her best feature.

feature noun (ARTICLE)

C2 [C] a special article in a newspaper or magazine, or a part of a television or radio broadcast, that deals with a particular subject: a double-page feature on global warming

feature noun (FILM)

[C] (also feature film) a film that is usually 90 or more minutes long

feature

verb [I + adv/prep, T] uk   /ˈfiː.tʃər/ us    /-tʃɚ/
B2 to include someone or something as an important part: The film features James Dean as a disaffected teenager. This week's broadcast features a report on victims of domestic violence. It's an Australian company whose logo features a red kangaroo.
(Definition of feature from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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