feel Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of "feel" - English Dictionary

See all translations

feelverb

uk   us   /fiːl/ (felt, felt)

feel verb (EXPERIENCE)

A1 [L or T] to experience something physical or emotional: "How are you feeling?" "Not too bad, but I've still got a slight headache." How would you feel about moving to a different city? He's still feeling a little weak after his operation. My eyes feel really sore. I never feel safe when Richard is driving. Never in her life had she felt so happy. My suitcase began to feel really heavy after a while. I felt like (= thought that I was) a complete idiot/such a fool. She felt his hot breath on her neck. [+ obj + -ing verb ] I could feel the sweat trickling down my back. By midday, we were really feeling (= suffering from) the heat.feel like sth B1 to have a wish for something, or to want to do something, at a particular moment: I feel like (going for) a swim. I feel like (having) a nice cool glass of lemonade. "Are you coming to aerobics?" "No, I don't feel like it today." [+ -ing verb] to want to do something that you do not do: He was so rude I felt like slapping his face.feel the cold to get cold quicker and more often than most people: As you get older, you tend to feel the cold more.not feel a thing informal to not feel any pain: "Did it hurt?" "Not at all - I didn't feel a thing."
More examples

feel verb (OPINION)

B1 [I or T] to have a particular opinion about or attitude towards something: [+ (that)] I feel (that) I should be doing more to help her. [(+ to be) + adj] He had always felt himself (to be) inferior to his brothers. Do you feel very strongly (= have strong opinions) about this? I feel certain I'm right.
More examples

feel verb (TOUCH)

B2 [I or T] to touch something in order to discover something about it: [+ question word] Just feel how cold my hands are! He gently felt the softness of the baby's cheek. I was feeling (around) (= searching with my hand) in my bag for the keys.
More examples

feelnoun

uk   us   /fiːl/

feel noun (TOUCH)

[S] the way that something feels: She loved the feel of silk against her skin. [C] mainly UK informal the action of touching something: Is that shirt silk? Ooh, let me have a feel!

feel noun (CHARACTER)

[S] (also feeling) the character of a place or situation: I like the decoration - it's got a Spanish feel to it. There was a feel of mystery about the place. We were there for such a short time, we didn't really get the feel of (= get to know) the place.

feel noun (UNDERSTANDING)

a feel for sth (also feeling) a natural understanding or ability, especially in a subject or activity: She has a real feel for language. I tried learning the piano, but I never had much of a feel for it.get the feel of sth (also feeling) to learn how to do something, usually a new activity: Once you get the feel of it, using a mouse is easy.
(Definition of feel from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of feel?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “feel” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day
stretch the truth

to say something that is not completely honest in order to make someone or something seem better than it really is

Word of the Day

July 4th, Bastille Day, and the language of revolution.
July 4th, Bastille Day, and the language of revolution.
by Liz Walter,
July 01, 2015
With the USA’s Independence Day on the 4th and France’s Bastille Day on the 14th, July certainly has a revolutionary theme, so this blog looks at words and phrases we use to talk about the dramatic and nation-changing events that these days celebrate. In particular, it focuses on one of the most

Read More 

generation pause noun
generation pause noun
July 06, 2015
informal young adults who are not able to do things previously typical for their age group such as buy a home or start a family because of lack of money Meanwhile, a new study released last week revealed a quarter of Brits believe they’ll never own a property, leading them to be

Read More