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English definition of “finish”

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finish

verb uk   /ˈfɪn.ɪʃ/ us  

finish verb (COMPLETE/END)

A1 [I or T] to complete something or come to the end of an activity: I'll call you when I've finished my homework. Please place your questionnaire in the box when you're finished. She finished (the concert) with a song from her first album. She finished second (= in second place) in the finals. [+ -ing verb] Have you finished reading that magazine? They've already run out of money and the building isn't even half-finished (= half of it has not been completed).A1 [I] to end: The meeting should finish around four o'clock. The play finishes with a wedding.B1 [T] to eat, drink, or use something completely so that none remains: Make sure she finishes her dinner. He finished his drink and left. We finished (= ate all of) the pie last night.
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finish verb (WOOD)

[T] If you finish something made of wood, you give it a last covering of paint, polish, or varnish so that it is ready to be used.

finish

noun [C] uk   /ˈfɪn.ɪʃ/ us  

finish noun [C] (COMPLETE/END)

B1 the end of a race, or the last part of something: a close finish They replayed the finish in slow motion.
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finish noun [C] (WOOD)

the condition of the surface of a material such as wood: Look at the beautiful shiny finish on that piano. the last covering of varnish, polish, or paint, that is put onto something: Even a clear finish will alter the colour of wood slightly.
(Definition of finish from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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