flag Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "flag" - English Dictionary

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flagnoun [C]

uk   us   /flæɡ/

flag noun [C] (SYMBOL)

B1 a piece of cloth, usually rectangular and attached to a pole at one edge, that has a pattern that shows it represents a country or a group, or has a particular meaning: Flags of all the participating countries are flying outside the stadium. Flags were flapping/fluttering in the breeze. The guard waved his flag and the train pulled away from the station.
More examples

flag noun [C] (STONE)

UK a flagstone

flag noun [C] (PLANT)

a flower that is a type of large iris

flagverb

uk   us   /flæɡ/ (-gg-)

flag verb (MARK)

[T] to put a mark on something so it can be found easily among other similar things: Flag any files that might be useful later. [T] specialized computing to mark computer information with one of two possible values so that you can deal with it later: We'll flag the records of interest in the database and then we can give you a print-out.

flag verb (BECOME TIRED)

[I] to become tired, weaker, or less effective: I was starting to flag after the ninth mile. The conversation was flagging.
Phrasal verbs
Translations of “flag”
in Arabic عَلَم, رَاية…
in Korean 기…
in Malaysian bendera…
in French drapeau…
in Turkish bayrak…
in Italian bandiera…
in Chinese (Traditional) 象徵, 旗…
in Russian флаг…
in Polish flaga…
in Vietnamese cờ…
in Spanish bandera…
in Portuguese bandeira…
in Thai ธง…
in German die Fahne…
in Catalan bandera…
in Japanese 旗…
in Indonesian bendera…
in Chinese (Simplified) 象征, 旗…
(Definition of flag from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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