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English definition of “flame”

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flame

noun uk   /fleɪm/ us  

flame noun (FIRE)

B2 [C or U] burning gas (from something on fire) which produces usually yellow light: The flames grew larger as the fire spread. The car flipped over and burst into flames (= started burning immediately). When the fire engine arrived the house was already in flames (= burning).
More examples

flame noun (EMOTION)

[C] literary a powerful feeling: Flames of passion swept through both of them.
See also

flame noun (COMPUTING)

[C] slang an angry or offensive email: flame wars

flame

verb uk   /fleɪm/ us  

flame verb (BURN)

[I] literary to burn (more) brightly: The fire flamed cosily in the hearth. The fire suddenly flamed (up).

flame verb (EMOTION)

[I] literary If an emotion flames, you feel it suddenly and strongly: Seeing the damage made hatred flame within her. [I] literary to suddenly become hot and red with emotion: His face flamed (red) with anger.

flame verb (COMPUTING)

[T] slang to send an angry or insulting email: Please don't flame me if you disagree with this message.
Translations of “flame”
in Korean 불꽃…
in Arabic لَهَب, شُعْلة…
in French flamme…
in Turkish alev, öfkeyle yazılmış ileti/e-posta…
in Italian fiamma…
in Chinese (Traditional) 火, 火焰, 火舌…
in Russian огонь, пламя, угроза или оскорбление в электронном виде…
in Polish płomień, bluzgi (= w mejlu, na forum…
in Spanish llama…
in Portuguese chama…
in German die Flamme…
in Catalan flama…
in Japanese 炎…
in Chinese (Simplified) 火, 火焰, 火舌…
(Definition of flame from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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