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English definition of “flap”

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flap

verb uk   /flæp/ (-pp-) us  

flap verb (WAVE)

[I or T] to wave something, especially wings when or as if flying: A small bird flapped its wings furiously and flew off. Flags flapped in the breeze above their tents.

flap verb (BEHAVE NERVOUSLY)

[I] UK informal to behave in a nervous and excited way: Don't flap - there's plenty of time to cook before they arrive. Stop flapping about/around!

flap

noun uk   /flæp/ us  

flap noun (ADDITIONAL PIECE)

[C] a piece of cloth or other material fixed along one edge, especially used for covering or closing something: a pocket flap a tent flap (= a piece of cloth that acts like a door) A small flap of skin can be seen above the wound.

flap noun (EXCITEMENT)

[S] mainly UK informal a state of nervous excitement: She's in a flap because her parents are coming to visit. [S] US a lot of public anger, excitement, or discussion: She claimed to have had an affair with the candidate, which produced a huge media flap.

flap noun (AIRCRAFT PART)

[C] specialized engineering part of the back of an aircraft wing that can be moved up or down to help the aircraft go up or down

flap noun (WAVE)

[C] the action of a bird waving its wings when flying, or of something else moving in this way: A few flaps of its long wings and the bird was gone.

flap noun (SPEECH SOUND)

[C] specialized phonetics a consonant sound made when the tongue moves forward and down, and quickly touches the alveolar ridge
(Definition of flap from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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