Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “fling”

See all translations

fling

verb uk   /flɪŋ/ (flung, flung) us  

fling verb (THROW)

[T usually + adv/prep] to throw something or someone suddenly and with a lot of force: He crumpled up the letter and flung it into the fire. "And you can take your ring back too!" she cried, flinging it down on the table. UK informal Could you fling the paper over here (= give me the paper)?

fling verb (MOVE/DO)

[T usually + adv/prep] to move or do something quickly and energetically: She flung her arms around his neck. The door was flung open by the wind. Sergei flung himself down on the sofa. UK informal Let me just fling (= quickly put) a few things into my bag, and I'll be right with you. UK informal They were flung (= quickly put) in prison.

fling verb (SAY ANGRILY)

[I or T, usually + adv/prep] mainly UK to say something angrily: They were flinging bitter accusations at each other. [+ speech] "I don't care what you think", she flung (back) at him.

fling

noun [C usually singular] uk   /flɪŋ/ informal us  
a short period of enjoyment: The girls are going to the beach for one last fling before the end of summer.
Translations of “fling”
in Spanish arrojar, lanzar, arrojarse…
in Arabic يَقْذِف, يُلْقي…
in Korean 내팽개치다…
in Portuguese jogar, lançar, arrojar…
in French lancer, se précipiter…
in German schleudern, stürzen…
in Catalan llançar, tirar…
in Japanese ~を投げつける…
in Chinese (Simplified) 扔, 猛扔,猛投,猛掷…
in Chinese (Traditional) 扔, 猛扔,猛投,猛擲…
in Italian scagliare, gettare…
(Definition of fling from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of fling?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “fling” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

be as cold as ice

to be extremely cold

Word of the Day

Let’s celebrate! (words and phrases for parties)

by Kate Woodford,
December 17, 2014
​​​ With Christmas and New Year almost upon us, we thought it a good time to look at the language of parties and celebrations. First, let’s start with the word ‘party’ itself. To have or throw a party or, less commonly, to give a party is to arrange a party: We’re having a

Read More 

cinderella surgery noun

December 15, 2014
cosmetic surgery to the feet We have all heard of people having nose jobs, boob jobs and liposuction – but now a new trend growing in popularity in America: Cinderella surgery.

Read More