flow definition, meaning - what is flow in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “flow”

See all translations

flow

verb [I] uk   /fləʊ/  us   /floʊ/

flow verb [I] (MOVE)

B1 (especially of liquids, gases, or electricity) to move in one direction, especially continuously and easily: Lava from the volcano was flowing down the hillside. Many short rivers flow into the Pacific Ocean. The river flows through three counties before flowing into the sea just south of here. With fewer cars on the roads, traffic is flowing (= moving forward) more smoothly than usual.
More examples

flow verb [I] (CONTINUE)

to continue to arrive or be produced: Please keep the money flowing in! Offers of help are flowing into the disaster area from all over the country. My thoughts flow more easily if I work on a computer. By eleven o'clock, the wine was starting to flow. After they'd all had a drink or two, the conversation began to flow.

flow verb [I] (HANG DOWN)

to hang down loosely and often attractively: Her long red hair flowed down over her shoulders.

flow

noun uk   /fləʊ/  us   /floʊ/

flow noun (MOVEMENT)

B2 [C usually singular] the movement of something in one direction: the flow of a river the flow of traffic the flow of blood
More examples

flow noun (CONTINUOUS NUMBER)

[C usually singular] a regular and quite large number of something: There's been a steady flow of visitors. [S] a situation in which something is produced or moved continuously: the flow of ideas/information
More examples
(Definition of flow from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of flow?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “flow” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

selfless

caring more for what other people need and want rather than for what you yourself need and want

Word of the Day

She’s got very good posture. (How we stand and sit)

by Kate Woodford,
May 27, 2015
Recently on this blog, we looked at the words that we use to describe the way we move. This week we’re looking at words for describing our bodies when they are still, whether we are standing or sitting. Since most of us do far too much of this, let’s start with sitting.

Read More 

ebolaphobia noun

June 01, 2015
irrational fear of the (spread of) the Ebola virus Ebolaphobia Going Viral

Read More