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English definition of “flow”

flow

verb [I] uk   /fləʊ/ us    /floʊ/

flow verb [I] (MOVE)

B1 (especially of liquids, gases, or electricity) to move in one direction, especially continuously and easily: Lava from the volcano was flowing down the hillside. Many short rivers flow into the Pacific Ocean. The river flows through three counties before flowing into the sea just south of here. With fewer cars on the roads, traffic is flowing (= moving forward) more smoothly than usual.

flow verb [I] (CONTINUE)

to continue to arrive or be produced: Please keep the money flowing in! Offers of help are flowing into the disaster area from all over the country. My thoughts flow more easily if I work on a word processor. By eleven o'clock, the wine was starting to flow. After they'd all had a drink or two, the conversation began to flow.

flow verb [I] (HANG DOWN)

to hang down loosely and often attractively: Her long red hair flowed down over her shoulders.

flow

noun uk   /fləʊ/ us    /floʊ/

flow noun (MOVEMENT)

B2 [C usually singular] the movement of something in one direction: the flow of a river the flow of traffic the flow of blood

flow noun (CONTINUOUS NUMBER)

[C usually singular] a regular and quite large number of something: There's been a steady flow of visitors. [S] a situation in which something is produced or moved continuously: the flow of ideas/information
(Definition of flow from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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