fold verb, noun definition, meaning - what is fold verb, noun in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “fold”

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fold

verb uk   /fəʊld/  us   /foʊld/

fold verb (BEND)

B1 [I or T] to bend something, especially paper or cloth, so that one part of it lies on the other part, or to be able to be bent in this way: I folded the letter (in half) and put it in an envelope. He had a neatly folded handkerchief in his jacket pocket. Will you help me to fold (up) the sheets? The table folds up when not in use. [T] literary to wrap: She folded her baby in a blanket. He folded his arms around her.fold your arms to bring your arms close to your chest and hold them together [T] to move a part of your body into a position where it is close to your body: She sat with her legs folded under her.
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fold verb (FAIL)

[I] (of a business) to close because of failure: Many small businesses fold within the first year.

fold

noun [C] uk   /fəʊld/  us   /foʊld/

fold noun [C] (BEND)

a line or mark where paper, cloth, etc. was or is folded: Make a fold across the centre of the card. specialized geology a bend in a layer of rock under the Earth's surface caused by movement there

fold noun [C] (SHELTER)

a small area of a field surrounded by a fence where sheep can be put for shelter for the nightthe fold your home or an organization where you feel you belong: Her children are all away at college now, but they always return to the fold during the holidays.
(Definition of fold verb, noun from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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