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English definition of “fool”

fool

noun uk   /fuːl/ us  

fool noun (PERSON)

B1 [C] a person who behaves in a silly way without thinking: [as form of address] You fool, you've missed your chance! He's a fool if he thinks she still loves him. [+ to infinitive] He's a fool to think she still loves him. He's fool enough to think she still loves him. My fool of a (= silly) husband has gone out and taken my keys! [C] in the past, a person who was employed in the court of a king or queen to make the court laugh by telling jokes and doing funny things act/play the fool to behave in a silly way, often intentionally to make people laugh: Stop acting the fool, I'm trying to talk to you. any fool anyone: Any fool could tell that she was joking. make a fool of sb B2 to trick someone or make someone appear stupid in some way make a fool of yourself B2 to do something that makes other people think you are silly or not to be respected: I got a bit drunk and made a fool of myself. more fool sb mainly UK said to mean that you think someone is being unwise: "I lent Rhoda $100 and she hasn't paid me back." "More fool you - you know what she's like!" be no fool (also be nobody's fool) to not be stupid or easily deceived: I notice Ed didn't offer to pay for her - he's no fool.

fool noun (SWEET DISH)

[C or U] a sweet, soft food made of crushed fruit, cream, and sugar: gooseberry fool

fool

verb uk   /fuːl/ us  
B2 [I or T] to trick someone: Don't be fooled by his appearance. She said she was doing it to help me but I wasn't fooled. Tim was fooled into believing that he'd won a lot of money. you could have fooled me! informal used to tell someone that you do not believe what they have just said: "Really, I'm very happy." "You could have fooled me."
Phrasal verbs

fool

adjective [before noun] uk   /fuːl/ mainly US informal us  
silly: You've done some fool things in your time, but this beats everything.
(Definition of fool from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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