foot Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "foot" - English Dictionary

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footnoun

uk   us   /fʊt/

foot noun (BODY PART)

A1 [C] (plural feet) the part of the body at the bottom of the leg on which a person or animal stands: I've got a blister on my left foot. I've been on my feet (= standing) all day and I'm exhausted.informal You look tired. Why don't you put your feet up (= sit or lie down with your feet resting on something)? Please wipe your feet (= clean the bottom of your shoes) before you come into the house.get/rise to your feet C2 to stand up after you have been sitting: He rose to his feet when she walked in.on foot A2 walking: Are you going by bicycle or on foot?
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foot noun (MEASUREMENT)

B1 [C] (plural feet or foot) (written abbreviation ft) a unit of measurement, equal to twelve inches or 0.3048 metres, sometimes shown by the symbol ′: The man was standing only a few feet away. She is five feet/foot three inches tall. She is 5′ 3″ tall.
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foot noun (BOTTOM)

C1 [S] the bottom or lower end of a space or object: They built a house at the foot of a cliff. She dreamed she saw someone standing at the foot of her bed. There's a note explaining the quotation at the foot of the page.

foot noun (POETRY)

[C] (plural feet) specialized literature a unit of division of a line of poetry containing one strong beat and one or two weaker ones

footverb [T]

uk   us   /fʊt/ informal
to pay an amount of money: His parents footed the bill for his college tuition. They refused to foot the cost of the wedding. The company will foot her expenses.
(Definition of foot from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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