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English definition of “form”

form

verb uk   /fɔːm/ us    /fɔːrm/
B2 [I or T] to begin to exist or to make something begin to exist: A crowd formed around the accident. A solution began to form in her mind. I formed the impression (= the way she behaved suggested to me) that she didn't really want to come. [T] to make something into a particular shape: She formed the clay into a small bowl. B1 [L only + noun] to make or be something: The lorries formed a barricade across the road. Together they would form the next government. This information formed the basis of the report. [I] formal (also form up) If separate things form, they come together to make a whole: The children formed into lines. The procession formed up and moved off slowly.

form

noun uk   /fɔːm/ us    /fɔːrm/

form noun (DOCUMENT)

A2 [C] a paper or set of papers printed with spaces in which answers to questions can be written or information can be recorded in an organized way: an application form (= document used for asking officially for something, for example a job) an entry form (= document used to enter a competition) Please fill in/out the form with black ink. When you have completed the form, hand it in at the desk.

form noun (TYPE)

B2 [C] a type of something: Swimming is the best form of exercise.

form noun (SHAPE)

C1 [C] the shape or appearance of something: I could just about make out his sleeping form on the bed. The moon highlighted the shadowy forms of the hills. The lawn was laid out in the form of the figure eight. take form to gradually be seen or gradually develop: Trees and hedges started to take form as the fog cleared. As they chatted, the idea of a holiday together gradually took form.

form noun (ABILITY)

[U] A competitor's form is their ability to be successful over a period of time: Both horses have shown good form over the last season. After a bad year, she has regained her form. be on good, great, etc. form C2 UK (US be in good, great, etc. form) to be feeling or performing well: Paul was on good form at the wedding and kept everyone entertained.

form noun (GRAMMAR)

B1 [C] specialized language one part of a verb or other word that has a special use or meaning: The continuous form of 'stand' is 'standing'. 'Stood' is an inflected form of 'stand'. 'Hers' is the possessive form of 'her'. 'Isn't' is the short form of 'is not'.

form noun (SCHOOL GROUP)

B1 [C] in the UK, a class of school children or a group of classes of children of a similar age

form noun (BEHAVIOUR)

bad form old-fashioned rude behaviour: Was that bad form then, leaving so early?

form noun (SEAT)

[C] old-fashioned a long, thin seat, usually without a back
(Definition of form from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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