forward Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "forward" - English Dictionary

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forwardadverb

uk   /ˈfɔː.wəd/  us   /ˈfɔːr.wɚd/ (also forwards)

forward adverb (DIRECTION)

B1 towards the direction that is in front of you: She leaned forward to whisper something in my ear.
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forward adverb (FUTURE)

B2 towards the future: I always look forward, not back.from that day forward formal after that point: From that day forward they never spoke to each other.
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forward adverb (PROGRESS)

C1 used in expressions related to progress: This is a big step forward for democracy.going forward used, especially in business, to mean "in the future": This could become a problem going forward.
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forwardadjective

uk   /ˈfɔː.wəd/  us   /ˈfɔːr.wɚd/

forward adjective (DIRECTION)

towards the direction that is in front of you: forward motion/movement

forward adjective (FUTURE)

relating to the future: forward planning/thinking

forward adjective (CONFIDENT)

disapproving confident and honest in a way that ignores the usual social rules and might seem rude: Do you think it was forward of me to invite her to dinner when we'd only just met?

forwardverb [T]

uk   /ˈfɔː.wəd/  us   /ˈfɔːr.wɚd/
to send a letter, etc., especially from someone's old address to their new address, or to send a letter, email, etc. that you have received to someone else: I'll forward any mail to your new address. I'll forward his email to you if you're interested.

forwardnoun [C]

uk   /ˈfɔː.wəd/  us   /ˈfɔːr.wɚd/
a player who is in an attacking position in a team
(Definition of forward from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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