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English definition of “frost”

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frost

noun uk   /frɒst/ us    /frɑːst/
B2 [U] the thin, white layer of ice that forms when the air temperature is below the freezing point of water, especially outside at night: When I woke up this morning the ground was covered with frost.B2 [C or U] a weather condition in which the air temperature falls below the freezing point of water, especially outside at night: There was a frost last night. There were a lot of hard/heavy (= severe) frosts that winter.
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frost

verb uk   /frɒst/ us    /frɑːst/

frost verb (COLD)

[I or T] to become covered in frost: Our bedroom window frosted up. Our lawn is frosted over.

frost verb (CAKE)

[T] US ( mainly UK ice) to cover a cake with icing : Leave the cake to cool before frosting it.

frost verb (HAIR)

[T] US to make narrow strips of a person's hair a more pale colour than the surrounding hair

frost verb (GLASS)

[T] to intentionally make glass less smooth to stop it being transparent
Translations of “frost”
in Korean 서리…
in Arabic صَقيع…
in French givre, gel(ée)…
in Turkish don, kırağı, ayaz…
in Italian gelo, gelata, brina…
in Chinese (Traditional) 霜期, 冰凍天氣, 霜…
in Russian иней, мороз…
in Polish szron, mróz…
in Spanish escarcha, helada…
in Portuguese geada…
in German der Frost…
in Catalan glaçada, gebre…
in Japanese 霜…
in Chinese (Simplified) 霜期, 冰冻天气, 霜…
(Definition of frost from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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