Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “fruit”

See all translations

fruit

noun uk   /fruːt/ us  

fruit noun (PLANT PART)

A1 [C or U] the soft part containing seeds that is produced by a plant. Many types of fruit are sweet and can be eaten: Apricots are the one fruit I don't like. Oranges, apples, pears, and bananas are all types of fruit. Would you like some fruit for dessert? The cherry tree in our garden is in fruit (= it has fruit growing on it). I like exotic fruit, like mangoes and papayas. How many pieces of fresh fruit do you eat in a day? fruit trees He runs a fruit and vegetable stall in the market.
Compare
[C] specialized biology the part of any plant that holds the seeds
More examples

fruit noun (RESULT)

the fruit/fruits of sth C2 the pleasant or successful result of work or actions: This book is the fruit of 15 years' research. It's been hard work, but now the business is running smoothly you can sit back and enjoy the fruits of your labours.

fruit noun (PERSON)

[C] slang a gay man. Many people consider this word offensive.

fruit

verb [I] uk   /fruːt/ specialized us  
When a plant fruits, it produces fruit: Over the last few years, our apple trees have been fruiting much earlier than usual.
Translations of “fruit”
in Korean 과일…
in Arabic فاكِهة…
in French fruit…
in Turkish meyve…
in Italian frutto, frutta…
in Chinese (Traditional) 植物的部分, 水果, 果實…
in Russian фрукт…
in Polish owoc, owoce…
in Spanish fruta, fruto…
in Portuguese fruta…
in German die Frucht, der Ertrag…
in Catalan fruita…
in Japanese フルーツ…
in Chinese (Simplified) 植物的部分, 水果, 果实…
(Definition of fruit from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of fruit?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “fruit” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

punt

a long, narrow boat with a flat bottom and a square area at each end, moved by a person standing on one of the square areas and pushing a long pole against the bottom of the river

Word of the Day

Byronic, Orwellian and Darwinian: adjectives from names.

by Liz Walter,
April 15, 2015
Becoming an adjective is a strange kind of memorial, but it is often a sign of a person having had real influence on the world. Science is full of examples, from Hippocrates, the Greek medic born around 460 BC, who gave his name to the Hippocratic Oath still used by doctors today,

Read More 

dumbwalking noun

April 20, 2015
walking slowly, without paying attention to the world around you because you are consulting a smartphone He told me dumbwalking probably wouldn’t be a long-term problem.

Read More