fuse Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of "fuse" - English Dictionary

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fusenoun [C]

uk   us   /fjuːz/

fuse noun [C] (SAFETY PART)

a small safety part in an electrical device or piece of machinery that causes it to stop working if the electric current is too high, and so prevents fires or other dangers: My hairdryer's stopped working - I think the fuse has blown (= broken). Have you tried changing the fuse?

fuse noun [C] (DEVICE ON EXPLOSIVE)

a string or piece of paper connected to a firework or other explosive product by which it is lit, or a device inside a bomb that causes it to explode after a fixed length of time or when it hits or is near something: He lit the fuse and ran.

fuseverb [I or T]

uk   us   /fjuːz/

fuse verb [I or T] (JOIN)

to join or become combined: Genes determine how we develop from the moment the sperm fuses with the egg. The bones of the skull are not properly fused at birth. In Istanbul, East and West fuse together in a way that is fascinating to observe.

fuse verb [I or T] (MELT)

to (cause to) melt (together) especially at a high temperature: The heat of the fire fused many of the machine's parts together.

fuse verb [I or T] (STOP WORKING)

UK When an electrical device or piece of machinery fuses, or when someone or something fuses it, it stops working because the electric current is too high: Either my headlights have fused or the bulbs have gone. The kids were messing around with the switches and they fused the lights.
(Definition of fuse from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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