gag definition, meaning - what is gag in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “gag”

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gag

noun [C] uk   us   /ɡæɡ/

gag noun [C] (PIECE OF CLOTH)

a piece of cloth that is tied around a person's mouth or put inside it in order to stop the person from speaking, shouting, or calling for help: Her hands and feet were tied and a gag placed over her mouth.

gag noun [C] (JOKE)

informal a joke or funny story, especially one told by a comedian (= person whose job is to make people laugh): I did a few opening gags about the band that had been on before me. US a trick played on someone or an action performed to entertain other people

gag

verb uk   us   /ɡæɡ/ (-gg-)

gag verb (ALMOST VOMIT)

[I] to experience the sudden uncomfortable feeling of tightness in the throat and stomach that makes you feel you are going to vomit: Just the smell of liver cooking makes me gag. I tried my best to eat it but the meat was so fatty I gagged on it.

gag verb (PREVENT FROM TALKING)

[T] to put a gag on someone's mouth: He was bound and gagged and left in a cell for three days. [T often passive] to prevent a person or organization from talking or writing about a particular subject: The media have obviously been gagged because nothing has been reported.

gag verb (BE EAGER)

be gagging for/to do sth UK slang to be very eager to do something: I was gagging for a pint of cold lager.be gagging for it slang to be very eager to have sex
(Definition of gag from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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