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English definition of “gain”

gain

verb [I or T] (GET)    /ɡeɪn/
B1 to get something that is useful, that gives you an advantage, or that is in some way positive, especially over a period of time: The Nationalist Party have gained a lot of support in the south of the country. What do you hope to gain from the course? Alternative medicine has only just started to gain respectability in our society. [+ two objects] It was her performances in Aida which gained her an international reputation as a soprano. After you've gained some experience teaching abroad you can come home and get a job. From the late 19th century, European powers began to gain control of parts of the Ottoman Empire. She's certainly gained (in) confidence over the last couple of years. The data exists all right - the difficulty is in gaining access to it. The thieves gained entrance through an upstairs window that was left open.Getting, receiving and acceptingCapturing or taking possession of things gain ground C1 If a political party or an idea or belief gains ground, it becomes more popular or accepted: The Republicans are gaining ground in the southern states.Liked, or not liked, by many people
(Definition of gain verb (GET) from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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