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English definition of “generation”

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generation

noun uk   /ˌdʒen.əˈreɪ.ʃən/ us  

generation noun (AGE GROUP)

B1 [C, + sing/pl verb] all the people of about the same age within a society or within a particular family: The younger generation smoke/smokes less than their parents did. There were at least three generations - grandparents, parents and children - at the wedding. It's our duty to preserve the planet for future generations. This painting has been in the family for generations.B2 [C, + sing/pl verb] a period of about 23 to 30 years, in which most human babies become adults and have their own children: A generation ago, home computers were virtually unknown.first, second, third, etc. generation used to describe the nationality of someone belonging to the first, second, third, etc. group of people of the same age in the family to have been born in that country: She's a second-generation American (= her parents were American, although their parents were not).
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generation noun (ENERGY)

B2 [U] the production of energy in a particular form: electricity generation from wind and wave power
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generation noun (PRODUCT)

B2 [C, + sing/pl verb] a group of products or machines that are all at the same stage of development: a new generation of low-fat margarines Scientists are working on developing the next generation of supercomputers.
(Definition of generation from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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