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English definition of “glimmer”

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glimmer

verb [I] uk   /ˈɡlɪm.ər/ us    //
to shine with a weak light or a light that is not continuous: The lights of the village were glimmering in the distance. The sky glimmered with stars. a glimmering candle figurative The first faint signs of an agreement began to glimmer through (= appear).

glimmer

noun [C] uk   /ˈɡlɪm.ər/ us    // ( also glimmering )

glimmer noun [C] (LIGHT)

a light that glimmers weakly: We saw a glimmer of light in the distance.

glimmer noun [C] (SIGN)

a slight sign of something good or positive: This month's sales figures offer a glimmer of hope for the depressed economy. She's never shown a glimmer of interest in classical music. The first glimmer of light (= sign of development or understanding) has appeared in the peace talks.
Translations of “glimmer”
in Korean 희미한 빛…
in Arabic وَميض…
in French luire faiblement…
in Turkish titrek ışık…
in Italian barlume, luccichio…
in Chinese (Traditional) 發出微弱的光, 隱約閃爍…
in Russian мерцание…
in Polish promyk, migotanie…
in Spanish brillar con luz tenue/trémula, rielar…
in Portuguese luz trêmula e fraca…
in German schimmern…
in Catalan llum tènue…
in Japanese かすかな光, ぼんやりとした光…
in Chinese (Simplified) 发出微弱的光, 隐约闪烁…
(Definition of glimmer from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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