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English definition of “go out”

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go out

verb uk phrasal verb with go   /ɡəʊ/ us    /ɡoʊ/ ( present participle going, past tense went, past participle gone)

(LEAVE)

A1 to leave a room or building, especially in order to do something for entertainment: Please close the door as you go out. Do you fancy going out for a meal after work? It's terribly smoky in here - I'm just going out for a breath of fresh air. [+ -ing verb] I wish you'd spend more time at home instead of going out drinking with your friends every night.
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(RELATIONSHIP)

B1 to have a romantic and usually sexual relationship with someone: How long have you been going out with him? They'd been going out (together/with each other) for almost five years before he moved in with her.
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  • They went out with each other for five years before getting married.
  • She's going out with one of her colleagues.
  • He hasn't gone out with anyone since he got divorced two years ago.
  • He has gone out with a string of beautiful women.
  • She will only go out with men who are taller than her.

(SEA)

If the tide goes out, it moves back and covers less of the beach.
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(LIGHT/FIRE)

B1 If a light or something that is burning goes out, it stops producing light or heat: When I woke up the fire had gone out.

(SPORT)

UK to lose when you are playing in a sports competition, so that you must stop playing in the competition: England went out to France in the second round of the championship.
(Definition of go out from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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“go out” in English

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