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English definition of “grace”

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grace

noun uk   /ɡreɪs/ us  

grace noun (MOVEMENT)

C1 [U] a quality of moving in a smooth, relaxed, and attractive way: Joanna has natural grace and elegance.

grace noun (POLITENESS)

C2 [U] the quality of being pleasantly polite, or a willingness to be fair and honest: They accepted their defeat with good grace.graces     /ɡreɪsɪz/ [plural] ways of behaving that are considered polite and pleasant: Ken is sadly lacking in social graces.

grace noun (APPROVAL)

[U] formal approval or kindness, especially (in the Christian religion) that is freely given by God to all humans: Betty believed that it was through divine grace that her husband had recovered from his illness.by the grace of God formal through the kindness or help of God: By the grace of God, the pilot managed to land the damaged plane safely.

grace noun (PRAYER)

[C or U] a prayer said by Christians before a meal to thank God for the food: The children always say grace at school.

grace noun (TIME)

[U] a period of time left or allowed before something happens or before something must be done: The exams have been postponed, so the students have a few days' grace before they start.

grace

verb [T] uk   /ɡreɪs/ us  
C2 When a person or thing graces a place or thing, they make it more attractive: Her face has graced the covers of magazines across the world.grace sb with your presence to honour people by taking part in something: We are delighted that the mayor will be gracing us with his presence at our annual dinner. humorous So you've finally decided to grace us with your presence, have you? (= You are late.)
(Definition of grace noun, verb from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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