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English definition of “great”

great

adjective uk   /ɡreɪt/ us  

great adjective (BIG)

A2 large in amount, size, or degree: an enormous great hole A great crowd had gathered outside the president's palace. The improvement in water standards over the last 50 years has been very great. A great many people would agree. The great majority of (= almost all) people would agree.formal It gives us great pleasure to announce the engagement of our daughter Maria.formal It is with great sorrow that I inform you of the death of our director. I have great sympathy for you. I spent a great deal of time there. [before noun] used in names, especially to mean large or important: a Great Dane (= large type of dog) Catherine the Great the Great Wall of China the Great Bear (= group of stars)

great adjective (FAMOUS)

B2 approving famous, powerful, or important as one of a particular type: a great politician/leader/artist/man/woman This is one of Rembrandt's greatest paintings. Who do you think is the greatest modern novelist?

great adjective (EXTREME)

B1 extreme: great success/difficulty

great adjective (GOOD)

A1 informal very good: a great idea We had a great time last night at the party. It's great to see you after all this time! "I'll lend you the car if you like." "Great! Thanks a lot!" "What's your new teacher like?" "Oh, he's great." "How are you feeling now?" "Great." informal used to mean that something is very bad: Oh great ! That's all I need - more bills!
greatness
noun [U] uk   /ˈɡreɪt.nəs/ us  
B2 skill and importance: Her greatness as a writer is unquestioned.

great

adverb [before noun], adjective uk   /ɡreɪt/ informal us  
B2 used to emphasize the meaning of another word: a great big spider a great long queue You great idiot! Pat's a great friend of mine.

great

noun [C] uk   /ɡreɪt/ us  
a famous person in a particular area of activity: former tennis great Arthur Ashe Woody Allen, one of the all-time greats of the cinema
(Definition of great adjective, adverb, adjective, noun from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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