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English definition of “grip”

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grip

verb uk   /ɡrɪp/ (-pp-) us  

grip verb (HOLD)

B2 [I or T] to hold very tightly: The baby gripped my finger with her tiny hand. Old tyres won't grip (= stay on the surface of the road) in the rain very well.
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grip verb (INTEREST)

C2 [T] to keep someone's attention completely: This trial has gripped the whole nation. I was gripped throughout the entire two hours of the film.

grip verb (EMOTION)

C2 [T usually passive] When an emotion such as fear grips you, you feel it strongly: Then he turned towards me and I was suddenly gripped by fear.

grip

noun uk   /ɡrɪp/ us  

grip noun (CONTROL)

[S] control over something or someone: Rebels have tightened their grip on the city.
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grip noun (HOLD)

B2 [C usually singular] a tight hold on something or someone: She tightened her grip on my arm. She would not loosen her grip on my arm.

grip noun (BAG)

[C] old-fashioned a bag for travelling that is smaller than a suitcase
Translations of “grip”
in Korean 꽉 움켜쥠…
in Arabic قَبْضة…
in French empoigner…
in Turkish sım sıkı tutma, kavrama, denetim…
in Italian presa, stretta…
in Chinese (Traditional) 抓住, 緊握, 握緊…
in Russian хватка, сжатие, власть…
in Polish uchwyt, chwyt, kontrola…
in Spanish empuñar, agarrar, aferrar…
in Portuguese ato de segurar, aperto…
in German packen…
in Catalan subjecció, agafada…
in Japanese しっかりつかむこと…
in Chinese (Simplified) 抓住, 紧握, 握紧…
(Definition of grip from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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