halt Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of "halt" - English Dictionary

See all translations

haltverb [I or T]

uk   /hɒlt/  us   /hɑːlt/
to (cause to) stop moving or doing something or happening: "Halt!" called the guard. "You can't go any further without a permit." Production has halted at all of the company's factories because of the pay dispute. Security forces halted the demonstrators by blocking the road.
More examples

haltnoun [S]

uk   /hɒlt/  us   /hɑːlt/
an occasion when something stops moving or happening: the recent halt in production Severe flooding has brought trains to a halt (= prevented them from moving) on several lines in Scotland. The bus came to a halt (= stopped) just in time to avoid hitting the wall. If traffic increases beyond a certain level, the city grinds to a halt (= stops completely). The car screeched to a halt (= suddenly and noisily stopped) just as the lights turned red.call a halt to sth to prevent something from continuing: How many more people will have to die before they call a halt to the fighting?
Translations of “halt”
in Arabic تَوَقُّف…
in Korean 중단…
in Malaysian berhenti…
in French (s’)arrêter…
in Turkish durma, hareketsiz kalma…
in Italian fermata, alt…
in Chinese (Traditional) (使)停止,停下…
in Russian остановка, прекращение…
in Polish bezruch, zatrzymanie się…
in Vietnamese chặn lại…
in Spanish parar, detener…
in Portuguese parada, alto, interrupção…
in Thai หยุด…
in German halten…
in Catalan parada, interrupció…
in Japanese 停止, 中止…
in Indonesian menghentikan…
in Chinese (Simplified) (使)停止,停下…
(Definition of halt from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of halt?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “halt” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day
straight

the straight part of a racetrack (= the track on which competitors race)

Word of the Day

Are you a glass-half-full person? (Everyday Idioms)
Are you a glass-half-full person? (Everyday Idioms)
by Kate Woodford,
July 29, 2015
A reader of this blog recently asked for a post on idioms that are used in everyday English. This seemed like a reasonable request. After all, if you are going to make the effort to learn a set of English idioms, you want those idioms to be useful. The question, then, was

Read More 

exoskeleton noun
exoskeleton noun
July 27, 2015
a robotic device which goes around the legs and part of the body of a person who cannot walk and allows them to move independently and in an upright position The device, known as an exoskeleton, is strapped to the outside of a person’s limbs and can then be controlled by them.

Read More