hammer Meaning, definition in Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of "hammer" - English Dictionary

See all translations

hammernoun [C]

uk   /ˈhæm.ər/  us   //

hammer noun [C] (TOOL)

B2 a tool consisting of a piece of metal with a flat end that is fixed onto the end of a long, thin, usually wooden handle, used for hitting things
More examples

hammer noun [C] (SPORT)

a heavy metal ball attached to a chain that is thrown as part of a sports eventthe hammer the event or sport in which a hammer is thrown as far as possible: She qualified for the women's hammer final.

hammer noun [C] (PART OF GUN)

the part of a gun that hits another part when you pull the trigger to send out the bullet

hammer noun [C] (PART OF PIANO)

one of the parts of a piano that hits the strings to make a sound

hammerverb

uk   /ˈhæm.ər/  us   //

hammer verb (USE TOOL)

[I or T, usually + adv/prep] to hit something with a hammer: Can you hold this nail in position while I hammer it into the door? I could hear you hammering upstairs. My car's got a dent, and I was hoping they'd be able to hammer it out (= remove it by hammering).

hammer verb (HIT WITH FORCE)

[I or T, usually + adv/prep] to hit or kick something with a lot of force: I was woken up suddenly by the sound of someone hammering on/at the front door. He hammered the ball into the net, giving France a 3–2 win over Italy.

hammer verb (DEFEAT)

[T] informal to defeat someone completely in a game or a fight: We were hammered in both games.

hammer verb (CRITICIZE)

[T] informal to criticize someone or something strongly: Her latest film has been hammered by the critics.
(Definition of hammer from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of hammer?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “hammer” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day
child benefit

money received regularly by families from the government to help pay for the costs of taking care of children

Word of the Day

Are you a glass-half-full person? (Everyday Idioms)
Are you a glass-half-full person? (Everyday Idioms)
by Kate Woodford,
July 29, 2015
A reader of this blog recently asked for a post on idioms that are used in everyday English. This seemed like a reasonable request. After all, if you are going to make the effort to learn a set of English idioms, you want those idioms to be useful. The question, then, was

Read More 

responsible luxury noun
responsible luxury noun
August 03, 2015
high-end, green tourism and hospitality Jumeirah’s ‘responsible luxury’ approach is an example of a sustainable travel experience – future guests will enjoy the environment as much as today’s.

Read More