Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “handle”

handle

noun [C] uk   /ˈhæn.dəl/ us  

handle noun [C] (PART)

B2 a part of an object designed for holding, moving, or carrying the object easily: a door handle the handle on a suitcase I can't pick the kettle up - the handle's too hot. She turned the handle and slowly opened the door.

handle noun [C] (NAME)

informal a name of a person or place, especially a strange one: That's some handle to go through life with!

handle

verb uk   /ˈhæn.dəl/ us  

handle verb (DEAL WITH)

B1 [T] to deal with, have responsibility for, or be in charge of: I thought he handled the situation very well. Some people are brilliant with computers, but have no idea how to handle (= behave with) other people. If you can't handle the job I'll get someone else to do it. Who handles the marketing in your company?

handle verb (TOUCH)

C2 [T] to pick something up and touch, hold, or move it with your hands: Always wash your hands before handling food. Please don't handle the vases - they're very fragile.

handle verb (OPERATE)

[T] to operate or control something that could be difficult or dangerous: Have you ever handled a gun before? [I usually + adv/prep] If a car handles well, it is easy and pleasant to drive.

handle verb (SELL)

[T] to buy and sell goods: We only handle cosmetics which have not been tested on animals.mainly UK He's been arrested for handling stolen goods.
(Definition of handle from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of handle?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “handle” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

give the green light to sth

to give permission for someone to do something or for something to happen

Word of the Day

Highly delighted, bitterly disappointed, ridiculously cheap: adverbs for emphasis.

by Liz Walter,
October 22, 2014
We often make adjectives stronger by putting an adverb in front of them. The most common ones are very and, for a stronger meaning, extremely: He was very pleased. The ship is extremely large. However, we don’t use very or extremely for adjectives that already have a strong meaning, for example fantastic,

Read More 

life tracking noun

October 20, 2014
the use of one or more devices or apps to monitor health, exercise, how time is spent, etc.

Read More