harbour definition, meaning - what is harbour in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “harbour”

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harbour

noun [C or U] UK (US harbor) uk   /ˈhɑː.bər/  us   /ˈhɑːr.bɚ/
B1 an area of water next to the coast, often protected from the sea by a thick wall, where ships and boats can shelter: Our hotel room overlooked a pretty little fishing harbour.
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harbour

verb [T] UK (US harbor) uk   /ˈhɑː.bər/  us   /ˈhɑːr.bɚ/

harbour verb [T] (HAVE IN MIND)

to think about or feel something, usually over a long period: He's been harbouring a grudge against her ever since his promotion was refused. There are those who harbour suspicions about his motives. Powell remains non-committal about any political ambitions he may harbour.

harbour verb [T] (HIDE)

to protect someone or something bad, especially by hiding that person or thing when the police are looking for him, her, or it: to harbour a criminal

harbour verb [T] (CONTAIN)

to contain the bacteria, etc. that can cause a disease to spread: Bathroom door handles can harbour germs.
Translations of “harbour”
in Arabic مَرْفأ…
in Korean 항구…
in Malaysian pelabuhan…
in French port…
in Turkish liman…
in Italian porto…
in Chinese (Traditional) 港口, 港灣…
in Russian гавань, порт…
in Polish port…
in Vietnamese cảng…
in Spanish puerto…
in Portuguese porto, ancoradouro…
in Thai ท่าเรือ…
in German der Hafen…
in Catalan port…
in Japanese (英)港, 港湾…
in Indonesian bandar…
in Chinese (Simplified) 港口, 港湾…
(Definition of harbour from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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