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English definition of “heavy”

heavy

adjective uk   /ˈhev.i/ us  

heavy adjective (WEIGHING A LOT)

A2 weighing a lot, and needing effort to move or lift: heavy equipment heavy work/lifting How heavy is that box? (= How much does it weigh?)

heavy adjective (TO A GREAT DEGREE)

B1 (especially of something unpleasant) of very or especially great force, amount, or degree: a heavy blow to the head heavy fighting heavy traffic heavy rain/snow a heavy smoker/drinker a heavy sleeper heavy seas sea that is rough with large waves

heavy adjective (SOLID)

thick, strong, solid, or strongly made: a heavy winter coat a heavy meal (= a large amount of solid food) a big man with heavy features describes soil that is thick and difficult to dig or walk through thick, solid-looking, and not delicate: The sun disappeared behind heavy clouds.

heavy adjective (MACHINES)

C2 describes machines or vehicles that are very large and powerful: heavy artillery/machinery

heavy adjective (UNPLEASANT)

old-fashioned slang describes something such as a situation that is dangerous or unpleasant: Then the police arrived and things got really heavy.

heavy

noun [C] uk   /ˈhev.i/ slang us  
a large strong man employed to protect someone else or to frighten other people: Frank always took a couple of heavies along with him when he went collecting his debts.
(Definition of heavy from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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