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English definition of “hunt”

hunt

verb [I or T] uk   /hʌnt/ us  

hunt verb [I or T] (CHASE)

B1 to chase and try to catch and kill an animal or bird for food, sport, or profit: Some animals hunt at night. When lion cubs are young, the mother stays with them while the father hunts for food. Jack and Charlie like to hunt/go hunting (= chase and kill animals for sport) at weekends. Cats like to hunt mice and birds. Elephants used to be hunted for the ivory from their tusks. in Britain, to chase and kill animals, especially foxes, using dogs and riding on horses

hunt verb [I or T] (SEARCH)

B2 to try to find something or someone: I've hunted all over the place, but I can't find that book. They are still hunting for the missing child. I've hunted high and low (= looked everywhere) for my gloves. Police are hunting the terrorists who planted the bomb. I'll try and hunt out (= find) those old photographs for you. They have spent months house-/job-hunting (= looking for a house/a job).
Phrasal verbs

hunt

noun uk   /hʌnt/ us  

hunt noun (SEARCH)

C1 [C usually singular] a search for something or someone: After a long hunt we finally found a house we liked. The hunt for the injured climber continued throughout the night. Police are on the hunt (= searching) for the kidnappers. The hunt is on (= the search has started) for a successor to Sir James Gordon.

hunt noun (CHASE)

[C] the activity of people chasing wild animals in order to kill them: to go on a fox/deer hunt [C] in the UK, a group of people who meet regularly in order to chase and kill animals, especially foxes: They are members of the local hunt.
(Definition of hunt from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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