immortal definition, meaning - what is immortal in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “immortal”

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immortal

adjective uk   /ɪˈmɔː.təl/  us   /-ˈmɔːr.t̬əl/
C2 living or lasting for ever: immortal God The priest said he was endangering his immortal soul.C2 very special and famous and therefore likely to be remembered for a long time: In the immortal words of Samuel Goldwyn, "Include me out."
immortality
noun [U] uk   /ˌɪm.ɔːˈtæl.ə.ti/  us   /-ɔːrˈtæl.ə.t̬i/
figurative The Wright brothers achieved immortality with the first powered flight in 1903.

immortal

noun uk   /ɪˈmɔː.təl/  us   /-ˈmɔːr.t̬əl/ literary
[C] someone who is so famous that they are remembered for a long time after they are dead: She is one of the immortals of classical opera.the immortals [plural] the Greek or Roman gods
Translations of “immortal”
in Arabic خالِد…
in Korean 죽지 않는, 불멸의, 불후의…
in Malaysian hidup selama-lamanya…
in French immortel…
in Turkish ölümsüz, ebedî, ölmez…
in Italian immortale…
in Chinese (Traditional) 永生的, 永存的, 不朽的,流芳百世的…
in Russian бессмертный, вечный…
in Polish nieśmiertelny…
in Vietnamese bất diệt…
in Spanish inmortal…
in Portuguese imortal…
in Thai ซึ่งเป็นอมตะ…
in German unsterblich…
in Catalan immortal…
in Japanese 不死の, 不朽の…
in Indonesian abadi…
in Chinese (Simplified) 永生的, 永存的, 不朽的,流芳百世的…
(Definition of immortal from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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