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English definition of “impression”

impression

noun uk   /ɪmˈpreʃ.ən/ us  

impression noun (OPINION)

B2 [C] an idea or opinion of what something or someone is like: I didn't get much of an impression of the place because it was dark when we drove through it. What was your impression of Charlotte's husband? I don't tend to trust first impressions (= the opinion you form when you meet someone or see something for the first time). [+ that] When I first met him I got/had the impression that he was a shy sort of a bloke. be under the impression B2 to think that something is true, especially when it is not: I was under the impression (that) you didn't get on too well. He was under the mistaken (= false) impression (that) you were married.

impression noun (EFFECT)

B2 [S] the way that something seems, looks, or feels to a particular person: It makes/gives/creates a very bad impression if you're late for an interview. [+ (that)] He likes to give the impression (that) he's terribly popular and has lots of friends.

impression noun (COPY)

[C] an attempt at copying another person's manner and speech, etc., especially in order to make people laugh: She does a really good impression of the president.

impression noun (MARK)

[C] a mark made on the surface of something by pressing an object onto it: There were impressions round her ankles made by the tops of her socks.

impression noun (BOOKS)

[C usually singular] (US also printing) all the copies of a book that have been printed at the same time without any changes being made: This is the second impression of the encyclopedia.
(Definition of impression from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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