Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “into”

See all translations

into

preposition uk   /ˈɪn.tuː/ us  

into preposition (INSIDE)

A1 to the inside or middle of a place, container, area, etc.: Would you put the jar back into the cupboard for me, please? Let's go into the garden. Stop running around and get into bed! I can't get into these trousers any more. They're far too small for me.
More examples

into preposition (CHANGE)

A2 used to show when a person or thing is changing from one form or condition to another: Peel the cucumber and chop it into small cubes. There was a series of explosions and the van burst into flames (= started to burn violently). Her novels have been translated into 19 languages. We're planning to turn the smallest bedroom into an office.
More examples

into preposition (TOUCHING FORCEFULLY)

B1 used to show movement that involves something touching something else with a lot of force but without moving inside it: He's always walking into things when he doesn't have his glasses on.
More examples

into preposition (TOWARDS)

B1 in the direction of something or someone: She was looking straight into his eyes.
More examples

into preposition (ABOUT)

involving or about something: an inquiry into the cause of the accident
More examples

into preposition (DIVISION)

used when referring to the division of one number by another number: What's 5 into 125?

into preposition (INTERESTED)

B1 enthusiastic about or interested in: Jackie's really into classical music.
(Definition of into from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of into?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “into” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

comma

the symbol , used in writing to separate parts of a sentence showing a slight pause, or to separate the single things in a list

Word of the Day

Lies, lies, lies!

by Kate Woodford,
February 25, 2015
​​​ According to sociologists (=people who study the relationships between people living in groups), we are good at lying. As a species, we have developed a remarkable ability to deceive each other (= persuade each other that something false is true). Being able to say things that are not true can help with

Read More 

snapchat verb

March 02, 2015
to send someone a message using the photomessaging application Snapchat We used to have a thing until he got a girlfriend. now

Read More