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English definition of “invade”

invade

verb uk   /ɪnˈveɪd/ us  
B2 [I or T] to enter a country by force with large numbers of soldiers in order to take possession of it: Concentrations of troops near the border look set to invade within the next few days. C1 [I or T] to enter a place in large numbers, usually when unwanted and in order to take possession or do damage: Hundreds of squatters have invaded waste land in the hope that they will be allowed to stay. [T] to enter an area of activity in a forceful and noticeable way: Maria looks set to invade the music scene with her style and image. C2 [T] to spoil a situation or quality for another person without thinking about their feelings: Famous people often find their privacy is invaded by the press.
(Definition of invade from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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