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English definition of “jar”

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jar

noun [C] uk   /dʒɑːr/ us    /dʒɑːr/

jar noun [C] (CONTAINER)

B1 a glass or clay container with a wide opening at the top and sometimes a fitted lid, usually used for storing food: a jar of coffee/pickled onions a jam jar UK informal a drink of beer: We often have a jar or two at the pub after work.
More examples

jar noun [C] (SHAKE)

a sudden forceful or unpleasant shake or movement: With every jar of the carriage, the children shrieked with excitement.

jar

verb uk   /dʒɑːr/ us    /dʒɑːr/ (-rr-)

jar verb (SHAKE)

[I or T] to shake or move someone or something unpleasantly or violently: The sudden movement jarred his injured ribs.

jar verb (NOT PLEASANT)

[I or T] If a sight, sound, or experience jars, it is so different or unexpected that it has a strong and unpleasant effect on something or someone: The harsh colours jarred the eye. A screech of brakes jarred the silence.

jar verb (NOT RIGHT)

[I] to disagree or seem wrong or unsuitable: This comment jars with the opinions we have heard expressed elsewhere.
Phrasal verbs
Translations of “jar”
in Korean 단지…
in Arabic مَرْطَبان…
in French pot…
in Turkish kavanoz…
in Italian vasetto, barattolo di vetro…
in Chinese (Traditional) 容器, 罐子,罎子, 廣口瓶…
in Russian банка…
in Polish słoik…
in Spanish tarro, bote…
in Portuguese pote, vaso…
in German das Gefäß…
in Catalan pot…
in Japanese びん…
in Chinese (Simplified) 容器, 罐子,坛子, 广口瓶…
(Definition of jar from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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