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English definition of “joke”

joke

noun uk   /dʒəʊk/ us    /dʒoʊk/

joke noun (FUNNY)

B1 [C] something, such as a funny story or trick, that is said or done in order to make people laugh: Did I tell you the joke about the chicken crossing the road? She spent the evening cracking (= telling) jokes and telling funny stories. She tied his shoelaces together for a joke. I hope Rob doesn't tell any of his dirty jokes (= jokes about sex) when my mother's here. He tried to do a comedy routine, but all his jokes fell flat (= no one laughed at them). Don't you get (= understand) the joke?

joke noun (BAD/SILLY)

C1 [S] informal a person or thing that is very bad or silly: Our new teacher's a bit of a joke - he can't even control the class. The new software is a complete joke - it keeps going wrong. The exam was a joke (= was very easy) - everyone finished in less than an hour.

joke

verb [I] uk   /dʒəʊk/ us    /dʒoʊk/
B1 to say funny things: They joked and laughed as they looked at the photos. It's more serious than you think, so please don't joke about it. [+ speech] "I didn't expect to be out so soon", he joked, after spending nine months in hospital. B1 If you think that someone is joking, you think that they do not really mean what they say: I thought he was joking when he said Helen was pregnant, but she really is. She wasn't joking (= she was serious) when she said she was going to move out of the house.
(Definition of joke from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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