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English definition of “jolly”

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jolly

adjective uk   /ˈdʒɒl.i/ us    /ˈdʒɑː.li/

jolly adjective (HAPPY)

happy and smiling: a jolly smile/manner/mood She's a very jolly, upbeat sort of a person.

jolly adjective (ENJOYABLE)

old-fashioned enjoyable, energetic, and entertaining: a jolly occasion We spent a very jolly evening together, chatting and reminiscing.

jolly adjective (ATTRACTIVE)

mainly UK bright and attractive: I love the bright yellow you've painted the children's room - it makes it look really jolly.

jolly

adverb uk   /ˈdʒɒl.i/ us    /ˈdʒɑː.li/ UK old-fashioned informal
very: That's a jolly nice scarf you're wearing.

jolly

verb [T + adv/prep] uk   /ˈdʒɒl.i/ us    /ˈdʒɑː.li/ informal
to encourage someone to do something by putting that person in a good mood and persuading them gently: I'll try to jolly my parents into letting me borrow the car this weekend. She didn't really want to go to the party, so we had to jolly her along a little.
Phrasal verbs
Translations of “jolly”
in Korean 행복한…
in Arabic مَرِح, بَشوش…
in French jovial…
in Turkish neşeli, şen şakrak, mutlu…
in Italian gaio, gioioso, allegro…
in Chinese (Traditional) 高興的, 興高采烈的,快活的…
in Russian веселый, приятный…
in Polish wesoły…
in Spanish alegre, divertido, gracioso…
in Portuguese jovial, alegre…
in German fröhlich…
in Catalan jovial…
in Japanese 上機嫌な…
in Chinese (Simplified) 高兴的, 兴高采烈的,快活的…
(Definition of jolly from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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