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English definition of “junior”

junior

noun uk   /ˈdʒuː.ni.ər/ us    /-njɚ/

junior noun (LOW RANK)

[C] someone who has a job at a low level within an organization: an office junior

junior noun (STUDENT)

[C] UK a student at a junior school [C] US a student in the third year of a course that lasts for four years at a school or college the juniors UK → junior school: Lewis has just moved up to the juniors.

junior noun (YOUNGER)

[C] a young person below a particular age who is involved in an activity, especially sport: Saturday morning sessions are for juniors only. three, eight, etc. years sb's junior C2 three, eight, etc. years younger than someone: My brother is five years my junior. My sister is my junior by three years (= three years younger than me).

junior noun (SON)

[S] mainly US used to refer to your son: Come on, Junior, time for bed.

junior

adjective uk   /ˈdʒuː.ni.ər/ us    /-njɚ/

junior adjective (LOW RANK)

B2 low or lower in rank: I object to being told what to do by someone junior to me. a junior doctor/partner

junior adjective (YOUNGER)

B2 connected with or involving young people below a particular age: junior orchestra Junior members are not permitted to compete. (US written abbreviation Jr., UK written abbreviation Jnr) used after a man's name to refer to the younger of two men in the same family who have the same name: Sammy Davis, Jr
(Definition of junior from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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