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English definition of “knot”

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knot

noun [C] uk   /nɒt/ us    /nɑːt/

knot noun [C] (FASTENING)

C2 a join made by tying together the ends of a piece or pieces of string, rope, cloth, etc.: to tie a knot
More examples

knot noun [C] (MASS)

a tight mass, for example of hair or string: Alice's hair is always full of knots and tangles.

knot noun [C] (GROUP)

a small group of people standing close together: Knots of anxious people stood waiting in the hall.

knot noun [C] (WOOD)

a small hard area on a tree or piece of wood where a branch was joined to the tree

knot noun [C] (MEASUREMENT)

specialized sailing, engineering, environment a measure of the speed of ships, aircraft, or movements of water and air. One knot is one nautical mile per hour: a top speed of about 20 knots
Idioms

knot

verb uk   /nɒt/ us    /nɑːt/ (-tt-)

knot verb (FASTEN)

[T] to tie in or with a knot: He caught the rope and knotted it around a post.

knot verb (FORM MASS)

[I] to form a tight, hard, rounded mass: His muscles knotted (= swelled) with the strain.
knotted
adjective uk   /ˈnɒt.ɪd/ us    /ˈnɑː.t̬ɪd/
a knotted rope
Translations of “knot”
in Korean 매듭…
in Arabic عُقْدة…
in French noeud, groupe…
in Turkish düğüm, deniz mili, uçak…
in Italian nodo…
in Chinese (Traditional) 繫結物, (繩等的)結…
in Russian узел, узел (количество морских миль в час)…
in Polish węzeł, supeł…
in Spanish nudo, grupo, corrillo…
in Portuguese nó…
in German der Knoten, der Astknorren, der Haufen…
in Catalan nus…
in Japanese 結び目…
in Chinese (Simplified) 系结物, (绳等的)结…
(Definition of knot from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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