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English definition of “like”

like

verb [T] (ENJOY)    /laɪk/
A1 to enjoy or approve of something or someone: I like your new haircut. Do you like fish? I like it when a book is so good that you can't put it down. I quite like wine but I could live without it. He's very well-liked (= popular) at work. I like the way he just assumes we'll listen to him when he doesn't take in a word anyone else says! (= I don't like it and it annoys me.) [+ -ing verb] I don't like upsetting people. [+ to infinitive] He likes to spend his evenings in front of the television. [+ past participle] He likes his steak well-done.Liking to show that you think something is good on a social networking website by clicking on a symbol or the word 'like': Like us on Facebook! Grammar:Hate, like, love and preferWe can use hate, like, love and prefer with an -ing form or with a to-infinitive:See moreGrammar:LikeLike has a number of meanings and uses.See moreGrammar:Like as a verb meaning ‘enjoy’We use like to talk about things or people which we enjoy or feel positive about:See moreGrammar:Would like in offers and requestsWe use would like or ’d like to offer something to someone in a polite way or to ask them to do something politely (requests), or politely to say what we want. We use the to-infinitive form of verbs that follow:See moreGrammar:Like as a preposition meaning ‘similar to’Like means ‘similar to’. We often use it with verbs of the senses such as look, sound, feel, taste, seem:See moreGrammar:Like as a conjunctionIn informal contexts, we can use like as a conjunction instead of as. Traditional grammar books consider this use of like incorrect:See moreGrammar:Like as a suffixWe can use like as a suffix at the end of a noun to mean ‘similar to’:See moreGrammar:Like in spoken EnglishIn informal speaking, you will hear like used very commonly. It has a number of functions. It is important not to use these forms in formal writing such as academic essays.See moreGrammar:Be like or what is … like?We can use be like to ask for a description of someone or something (e.g. their appearance, their character, their behaviour):See moreGrammar:Be like or look like?We use be like to talk about someone’s character or personality. We use look like to talk about someone’s appearance:See more
(Definition of like verb (ENJOY) from the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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