limp definition, meaning - what is limp in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “limp”

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limp

verb uk   us   /lɪmp/

limp verb (PERSON/ANIMAL)

[I] to walk slowly and with difficulty because of having an injured or painful leg or foot: Three minutes into the game, Jackson limped off the pitch with a serious ankle injury.

limp verb (PROCESS/THING)

[I + adv/prep] informal to move or develop slowly and with difficulty: The little boat limped slowly towards the shore. After limping along for almost two years, the economy is starting to show signs of recovery.

limp

adjective uk   us   /lɪmp/
soft and neither firm nor stiff: a limp lettuce leaf/salad a limp handshake
limply
adverb uk   us   /-li/
She lay limply in his arms.
limpness
noun [U] uk   us   /-nəs/

limp

noun [S] uk   us   /lɪmp/
a way of walking slowly and with difficulty because of having an injured or painful leg or foot: She has a slight limp. He walks with a limp.
Translations of “limp”
in Arabic رَخو…
in Korean 기운 없는…
in Malaysian layu…
in French mou, faible…
in Turkish zayıf, takatsiz, güçsüz…
in Italian floscio, flaccido…
in Chinese (Traditional) 人/動物, 瘸著腳走,跛行…
in Russian вялый, поникший…
in Polish wiotki, bezwładny…
in Vietnamese mềm, ủ rũ…
in Spanish flojo, flácido, mustio…
in Portuguese frouxo, murcho…
in Thai ปวกเปียก…
in German schlaff…
in Catalan fluix, flàccid…
in Japanese 弱弱しい…
in Indonesian lemas…
in Chinese (Simplified) 人/动物, (因为腿脚受伤或疼痛)艰难缓慢地行走…
(Definition of limp from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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