live definition, meaning - what is live in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “live”

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live

verb uk   us   /lɪv/

live verb (BE ALIVE)

B1 [I] (to continue) to be alive or have life: He only lived a few days after the accident. [+ to infinitive] I hope I live to see my grandchildren. Her granny lived to the ripe old age of 94. Can the right to live ever be denied to any human? She lived on well into her 90s.
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live verb (HAVE A HOME)

live in, at, etc.
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A1 to have your home somewhere: Where do you live? We live in Kingston. Some students live on the University campus. He lives with four other people in a shared house.
[I] informal to be kept usually in a particular place: Where do the knives live in your kitchen? I'm not sure where this bowl lives.

live verb (SPEND LIFE)

B1 [I usually + adv/prep, T] to spend your life in a particular way: After a while you get used to living alone. When you retire, you want to live a comfortable life. So the couple got married and lived happily ever after. He simply wants to live (out) (= experience) the rest of his days in peace. The TV's broken - we'll just have to live without (= not have) it for a while. She certainly lived her life to the full (= was always doing something interesting).figurative The US is living beyond its means (= spending more than it earns).
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live verb (STAY ALIVE)

C2 [I] to stay alive, especially by getting enough money to pay for food, a place to stay, clothing, etc.: For several years she lived by begging. She has an inheritance to live off (US also live off of) so she doesn't need to work. He only agreed to marry her so he could live off her (money).
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live verb (CONTINUE)

[I] (of things that are not alive) to exist or continue to exist: The memory of those terrible days lives on.

live verb (INTERESTING LIFE)

[I] to have an interesting life: I want to live a little before I settle down. If you haven't seen Venice, you haven't lived.

live

adjective uk   us   /laɪv/

live adjective (HAVING LIFE)

[before noun] having life: Millions of live animals are shipped around the world each year. There was a tank of live lobsters in the restaurant.
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live adjective (AS IT HAPPENS)

B1 (of a performance) broadcast, recorded, or seen while it is happening: This evening there will be a live broadcast of the debate. a live recording
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live adjective (ELECTRICITY)

(of a wire) carrying or charged with electricity: a live wire

live adjective (ABLE TO EXPLODE)

able to explode: live rounds of ammunition live shells

live adjective (BURNING)

(of a fire, coals, or a match) still burning or able to burn: There are live coals in the fireplace.

live

adverb uk   us  
broadcast as it happens; performing or being performed in front of an audience: I've got two tickets to see them (perform) live.go live If a new system, especially a computer system, goes live, it starts to operate: Our new payments system will go live at the beginning of next month.
(Definition of live from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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