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English definition of “lose”

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lose

verb uk   /luːz/ (lost, lost) us  

lose verb (NOT HAVE)

A2 [T] to no longer have something because you do not know where it is: I've lost my ticket. He's always losing his car keys.A2 [T] to have something or someone taken away from you: At least 600 staff will lose their jobs if the factory closes. He lost his leg in a car accident. She lost her mother (= her mother died) last year.B2 [T] to stop feeling something: to lose confidence/faith I lost interest halfway through the book. He kept on crying and I lost my patience.B1 [T] to have less of something than you had before: I'm trying to lose weight. He's losing his hair. She lost a lot of blood in the accident. to lose your memory/sightB2 [T] If you lose time, you waste it: Four million hours were lost last year through stress-related illnesses. We lost valuable time stuck in traffic. [T] If a clock loses time, it goes more slowly than it should: My watch loses ten minutes every day. [T] informal to get rid of something: Lose the belt and let's see how the dress looks.lose money, dollars, pounds, etc. C1 A business that is losing money is spending more money than it is receiving: Banks will lose millions of pounds because of new legislation.
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lose verb (BE DEFEATED)

B1 [I or T] to fail to succeed in a game, competition, etc.: If we lose this game, we're out of the championship. They're losing 3–1. They lost to Cincinnati. Everyone hates losing an argument. They hadn't lost an election in 15 years.
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Phrasal verbs
(Definition of lose from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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