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English definition of “mad”

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mad

adjective uk   /mæd/ (madder or maddest) us  

mad adjective (MENTALLY ILL)

B1 mentally ill, or unable to behave in a reasonable way: I think I must be going mad. Do I look like some mad old woman in this hat?
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mad adjective (SILLY)

B1 UK informal ( US usually crazy) extremely silly or stupid: [+ to infinitive] You're mad to walk home alone at this time of night. He must be mad spending all that money on a coat. Some of the things she does are completely mad.
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mad adjective (ANGRY)

A2 [after verb] informal very angry or annoyed: He's always complaining and it makes me so mad. mainly US Are you still mad at me? UK Kerry got really mad with Richard for not doing the washing up. UK Bill's untidiness drives me mad.
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mad adjective (HURRYING)

[before noun] UK hurrying or excited and not having time to think or plan: We made a mad dash for the train. I was in a mad panic/rush trying to get everything ready.

mad adjective (ENTHUSIASTIC)

be mad about sb/sth B1 informalUK to love someone or something: He's the first real boyfriend she's had and she's mad about him. He's mad about football.be mad for sb/sth UK informal to want someone or something very much, or to be very interested in someone or something: Everyone's mad for him and I just don't see the attraction.
(Definition of mad adjective from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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