magic definition, meaning - what is magic in the British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “magic”

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magic

noun [U] uk   us   /ˈmædʒ.ɪk/

magic noun [U] (SPECIAL POWER)

A2 the use of special powers to make things happen that would usually be impossible, such as in stories for children: The group is known for its belief in witchcraft and magic. As if by magic/Like magic, the car changes into a boat when it hits the water.A2 the skill of performing tricks to entertain people, such as making things appear and disappear and pretending to cut someone in half: He's a comedian who also does magic.
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magic noun [U] (SPECIAL QUALITY)

B2 a special and exciting quality that makes something seem different from ordinary things: Although the film was made 50 years ago, it has lost none of its magic. No one could fail to be charmed by the magic of this beautiful city.

magic

adjective uk   us   /ˈmædʒ.ɪk/
A2 with special powers: The witch put a magic spell on the prince and turned him into a frog. I'll show you a magic trick.B1 happening in an unusual or unexpected way, or easily or quickly: There's no magic solution to the problem. There's no magic formula for winning - just lots of hard work.
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magic

exclamation uk   us   /ˈmædʒ.ɪk/ UK old-fashioned informal
used when you think something is very good and you like it a lot: "Kate's having a party on Saturday night." "Magic!"
(Definition of magic from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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