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English definition of “march”

march

noun uk   /mɑːtʃ/ us    /mɑːrtʃ/

march noun (PUBLIC EVENT)

C1 [C] an event in which a large number of people walk through a public place to express their support for something, or their disagreement with or disapproval of something: She's going on a march on Saturday in protest over the closure of the hospital.

march noun (MUSIC)

[C] a piece of music with a strong, regular beat, written for marching to: a funeral march Mendelssohn's Wedding March

march noun (SOLDIERS' WALK)

[C or U] a walk, especially by a group of soldiers all walking with the same movement and speed: It had been a long march and the soldiers were weary. The border was within a day's march (= distance measured in time taken to walk it). on the march If soldiers are on the march, they have started marching to a place.

march noun (CONTINUOUS DEVELOPMENT)

[S] the continuous development of a state, activity, or idea: It is impossible to stop the forward march of progress/time. The island is being destroyed by the relentless march of tourism.

march

verb uk   /mɑːtʃ/ us    /mɑːrtʃ/

march verb (WALK)

C2 [I] to walk somewhere quickly and in a determined way, often because you are angry: She marched into my office demanding to know why I hadn't written my report. C1 [I] to walk through a public place as part of a public event to express support for something, or disagreement with or disapproval of something: Over four thousand people marched through London today to protest against the proposed new law. C1 [I or T] to walk with regular steps keeping the body stiff, usually in a formal group of people who are all walking in the same way: The band marched through the streets. The soldiers marched 90 miles in three days.

march verb (TAKE FORCEFULLY)

[T + adv/prep] to forcefully make someone go somewhere by taking hold of that person and pulling them there or going there together: Without saying a word, she took hold of my arm and marched me off to the headmaster's office. The police marched a gang of youths out of the building.
See also
(Definition of march noun, verb from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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