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English definition of “margin”

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margin

noun uk   /ˈmɑː.dʒɪn/ us    /ˈmɑːr-/

margin noun (DIFFERENCE)

C2 [C] the amount by which one thing is different from another: The Senate approved the use of military force by a margin of 52 votes to 47. The poll shows that the government is leading by the narrowest of margins.
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margin noun (PROFIT)

C2 [C or U] the profit made on a product or service: Our increased profits are due to improved margins and successful cost control. Using cheap labour increases profit margin.

margin noun (OUTER PART)

C2 [C] the empty space to the side of the text on a page, sometimes separated from the rest of the page by a vertical line: If I have any comments to make, I'll write them in the margin. [C] the outer edge of an area: The plant tends to grow in the lighter margins of woodland areas.on the margins of sth If someone is on the margins of a group of people, they are part of that group, but different in important ways, and if someone is on the margins of an activity, they are only slightly involved: He spent the 1980s on the margins of British politics. We need to reach out to those on the margins of society.
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margin noun (POSSIBILITY)

[C or U] something that makes a particular thing possible, such as an extra amount of money, time, etc. allowed that makes it possible to deal with an emergency: There is not much margin for creativity in a job like this. They allow an additional safety margin of five minutes between planes taking off.
(Definition of margin from the Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)
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